• Sri Gurvastakam

    Sri Gurvastakam

    I want to give an explanation of Sri Guru – what are the symptoms of a bona fide guru – and to show you examples that have been given in the epics [Vedic scriptures]. You can apply this to your own guru. Our Sri Guru is akhanda-guru-tattva, Sri Baladeva Prabhu or Sri Nityananda Prabhu, so all teachings should be applied to him and to others who are following this... Read More
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  • Our Master - His Life

    A most endearing hallmark of his preaching was the heart-stealing affection he showed to all. As an uttama-bhāgavata, he entered the deepest recesses of the heart to give the unmistakable reassurance that he is one's eternal well-wisher. The depth of his affection is a tangible reality for all who have experienced it, and this in itself bears subjective testimony to the fact that he was a true emissary of the Supreme Lord.

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  • Namah

    As long as Śrīla Gurudeva, the beloved of Śrī Kṛṣṇa, is physically manifest, it is wise to render intimate service to him, and thereby attain perfection. But if we are not able to attain perfection because we have failed to develop attachment to him, attachment wherein we consider him to be the lord of our heart; if we have failed to serve him by giving him our full heart in complete sincerity and selflessness, then we have certainly been deprived...

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  • The Most Compassionate

    Sri Caitanya Mahaprabhu is certainly more intelligent than each and every one of us, and He knows how to make the fallen souls of Kali-yuga best understand His high-level teachings. Indeed, His teachings are comprehensible by all. Still, our misfortune prevails. First, we do not accept His teachings. Second, to impress others with our prowess we mix something of our own with them...

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Rays of The Harmonist

  • Men act like infants
  • The Ultimate Goal of Life
  • Do Vedic Brāhmaṇas Know the Truth? Part 2 of 2

tn srila bhakitsiddhantaby Śrīla Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvatī Ṭhākura Prabhupāda

Those who want to remove their desires by means of enjoyment hanker for emancipation. But the devotees of God hanker neither for enjoyment nor for emancipation. When, because of a lack of exact knowledge about the truth, we rely only on relative knowledge, our desires are not removed therewith, and all of our acts evaporate like camphor...

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tn srila bhakitsiddhantaby Śrīla Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvatī Ṭhākura Prabhupāda

Men become confused about the spiritual deity they worship in the midst of their attempts to acquire the three main objects of human pursuit (tri-varga). These three are dharma, or virtue; artha, or wealth; and kāma, or desire...

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tn srila bhakitsiddhantaby Śrīla Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvatī Ṭhākura Prabhupāda

The many neighbours of Śrī Advaita Ācārya were high class brāhmaṇas. But among them, he could not find one single brāhmaṇato whom he might offer the śrāddha-pātra – the oblation meant for his ancestors...

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Featured: Sri Radha-krsna-ganoddesa-dipika

rk ganoddesa 200

 

In this book Śrīla Rūpa Gosvāmī has given a brief yet vital description of the names, forms, qualities and different services of Śrī Rādhā’s and Śrī Kṛṣṇa’s cherished companions. Such a comprehensive description of Śrī Kṛṣṇa and His companions is not found in any other single scripture.

 

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Porters at the train station wear red uniforms and have badges that say "Porter". They are supposed to charge Rs. 40 per bag, but always want at least Rs. 50 per bag from a tourist or  more if you clearly can't manage them yourself. You should fix the price before they touch your bags. I try to travel light and never use porters, though there have been times I wished I had.

New Delhi station is BIG, and if your train happens to be on platform ten, it's a long haul and you might be very happy to pay a porter. They are also good at finding your seat and getting your bags onto the train. They can also be useful once you get off a train if you have a lot of stuff. The second the train stops, lean out the door and wave to one. If there isn't one in sight, (rare) take your bags out as quickly as you can manage and keep them near the train. Try not to leave your bags unattended as this is one of the times things tend to disappear. Once on the train, the Traveling Ticket Examiner (TTE) will come along and check your name off a computerized list. It might be useful to ask him how many stops there are before Mathura Junction. For many express trains, it's the first stop. When the train pulls into the Mathura Junction station, you really have to be standing near the door with your bags prepared to jump off ahead of the crush of people coming on to the train, since they don't generally stop for long. This is more of a problem with the second class unreserved (cattle) cars. There will be many porters, rickshaw, auto rickshaw, and taxi wallahs there to greet you. Which mode you choose depends on where you are going. A taxi will cost about Rs. 300 to Vrindaban. For the economy minded there is also an auto rickshaw which is much less comfortable for Rs. 130 (there is a traffic police pre-paid booth for auto rickshaws). The fare to the Mathura Math is Rs. 30 by auto rickshaw and Rs. 20 by bike rickshaw. You tell them that you need to go Vikash Market, which is near the Math. There may be times when the prepaid booth is unmanned (as it was when I arrived) when haggling is required. The fares stated above should be considered the maximum you should pay in that case and should not present any problem for you. There used to be tempos from the Mathura Junction station, but there aren't anymore as the city of Mathura has banned tempos from certain parts of the city due to noise and air pollution concerns.

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